Pollokshields Burgh Hall, Glasgow

4.7
#308 of 549 in Things to do in Glasgow
The Pollokshields Burgh Hall stands at the edge of Maxwell Park, Glasgow, Scotland. Designed by Henry Edward Clifford and constructed in 17th-century Scottish Baronial style, this was opened in 1890 by Sir John Stirling Maxwell as a Masonic Meeting Place and for the use of the community but served the independent burgh of Pollokshields only until 1891 when the rapidly expanding city swallowed up the area. The hall contained various council offices and a courtroom. It continues to this day as a Masonic meeting place, hence the numerous Masonic symbols in the carvings (especially at the back of the building) and in the stained-glass windows.

The first lodge to meet there was Pollok No 772 on 25 October 1890. On that occasion the Foundation Stone was laid in the vestibule by Bro. Sir John Stirling Maxwell of Pollok, Bart., who with others were made Honorary Affiliates. Sir John donated the land for Maxwell Park and the Burgh Halls in 1888. On giving the Hall into the hands of Glasgow Corporation, a codicil was added, agreed and signed by both parties, stating that Lodge Pollok No 772 were to be always permitted to hold their meetings therein. Despite this document's apparent disappearance, it was presented to Glasgow Corporation at a time when they wanted to close it, saying it was surplus to requirements. This document saved the halls.

The hall is built of dark red sandstone from Ballochmyle in Ayrshire, which contrasts quite starkly with the blond sandstone used to build many of the surrounding villas.

The Maxwell family coat of arms is carved above the entrance porch of the Hall, flanked by two Scottish lions; and recorded in marble in the vestibule floor. The dominant external feature of the building is the 60-foot (18 m) high tower, housing a turret stair, corbelled balcony and vigil windows. To the left of the hall is the Lodge House comprising two flats, originally for the Burgh Sanitary Inspector and the Park Gardener.

In 1938 the back of the building was enlarged but with the loss of the end gallery in the large hall. By 1975 it was being used by the Social Work Department of Strathclyde Regional Council as an occupational day centre. In 1982 it was declared surplus to requirements and for sale on the open market. After local protest, a charitable trust was formed to ensure that the building would continue to serve the public. The Pollokshields Burgh Hall Trust Ltd acquired the building for £1 with missives being concluded in 1986. Only in 1991 was the title transferred with the condition that the derelict lodge house be restored within five years. With the support of generous funding from Historic Scotland, the Heritage Lottery Fund, Glasgow City Council, the Glasgow Development Agency and the local community, the lodge house and the ground floor of the Hall were completely restored and reopened in 1997. The lower ground floor has since attracted further funding and what was once little more than cellar space has been converted into an inspired, magnificent and contemporary conference or function amenity, with its own catering facilities, directly accessed through the rear loggia which opens on to Maxwell Park.

After over one hundred and twenty three years Pollokshields Burgh Hall continues to cater for business, weddings, family functions, meetings and mini conferences. This magnificent 19th century building continues in the 21st century to provide the services for which it was originally designed. Further details of the Hall and lettings can be found on the Trust's website.
Make Pollokshields Burgh Hall part of your personalized Glasgow itinerary using our Glasgow trip maker app.
Source
Create an itinerary including Pollokshields Burgh Hall
map
© OpenMapTiles © OpenStreetMap contributors

Pollokshields Burgh Hall Reviews

Rate this attraction
TripAdvisor Traveler Rating
TripAdvisor Traveler Rating 4.5
13 reviews
Google
4.4
TripAdvisor
  • Catering staff were very helpful and friendly in fact AMAZING SO LOVELY NOTHING was a problem, it's a REALLY lovely place, aside from a church wedding this is just a couple of steps down ,Big rooms...  more »
  • Attended the Burgh Hall on Daturday 4th, what a lovely venue for a wedding, Service was fantastic, place beautifully decorated, meal excellent. Fortunate to have nice weather so we could get...  more »
Google
  • MUSICONTHEMOVE have had the pleasure of providing Wedding entertainment at this venue on several occasions. Great venue with great staff. Ideal for hosting any type of function...but if you're planning a Wedding, then look no further. This place is stunning! Would highly recommend!
  • Fantastic venue for events! We were there for a wedding and the place is just gorgeous - it's got an old classic air to it but also it's got a whole lot you need for an event - nice outdoors area, bar and stage and dancing floor that can be quickly converted to a dining hall. Top notch!

Plan your trip to Glasgow

  • Get a personalized plan

    A complete day-by-day itinerary
    based on your preferences
  • Customize it

    Refine your plan. We'll find the
    best routes and schedules
  • Book it

    Choose from the best hotels
    and activities. Up to 50% off
  • Manage it

    Everything in one place.
    Everyone on the same page.

Popular things to do in Glasgow

4.7
Duration: 3 hours
4.7
Duration: 2h 30 min
5.0
Duration: 2 hours

Side trips from Glasgow

4.6
Duration: 2h 30 min
4.9
Duration: 2 hours
4.4
Duration: 2 hours
5.0
Duration: 2 hours

Hidden gems in Glasgow

4.7
Duration: 1h 30 min
4.7
Duration: 1h 30 min
4.3
Duration: 1h 30 min
5.0
Duration: 2 hours

Historic Sites in Glasgow

See all ›
4.6
Duration: 1h 30 min
4.6
Duration: 1h 30 min
4.6
Duration: 2 hours
4.4
Duration: 2 hours

Museums in Glasgow

See all ›
4.3
Duration: 2h 30 min
4.6
Duration: 2 hours
4.4
Duration: 1h 30 min
4.9
Duration: 2 hours

Nearby attractions in Glasgow

4.9
Duration: 2 hours
4.2
Duration: 3 hours
4.6
Duration: 1h 30 min
4.8
Duration: 2 hours
4.9
Duration: 4 hours
4.5
Duration: 2h 30 min
4.4
Duration: 2 hours
4.3
Duration: 1h 30 min